Category Archives: Photography

©CindyBajema_20140722_AMSA.d2_052

Guajeros : Finding Fortune

Solid waste disposal is not an issue that most people in the world think of on a daily basis. We shop. We eat. We throw away and in some instances, compost and recycle. Then, we go shop some more… But in many parts of the world, solid waste disposal is not part of the municipal or city infrastructure. Instead, these places often have loosely organized services provided by private individuals or small multi-generational family businesses. The dumps where this garbage lands are usually unorganized, unsafe, and unbelievable.

"Zopes" or black vultures are a contant presence for the guajeros at the AMSA landfill, a model solid waste project near Guatemala City. (Cindy Bajema)

“Zopes” or black vultures are a constant presence for the guajeros at the AMSA landfill, a model solid waste project near Guatemala City. (Cindy Bajema)

Guatemala is no exception. Central America’s largest garbage dump, the notorious “El Basurero de El Trébol” is located in Guatemala City. It has been the site of numerous toxic fires that have been hard to extinguish. There have been instances where sinkholes have swallowed whole trucks (and their drivers), mountains of garbage have collapsed on workers who were never seen again and daily environmental/work conditions cause frequent health problems and injuries. Despite this, an estimated 7,000 people, waste pickers referred to locally as “guajeros”, continue to work at the massive site dump, collecting plastic bottles, cans, paper, cardboard and metals, that they sell to recyclers. From other people’s trash, they make a living and support thousands of families. But the garbage dump is poorly managed and despite efforts by the municipality, it remains a dangerous and difficult place to make a living.

The scale of a recycler waits to weigh its next load at the AMSA landfill, a model solid waste site near Guatemala City. (Cindy Bajema)

The scale of a recycler waits to weigh its next load. (©Cindy Bajema)

Nearby, there is another place. A managed landfill that has been quietly working to do things in a better way. Mandated by the government of Guatemala in 1996, AMSA is an organization with the overall goal of restoring and protecting the watershed basin of nearby Lake Amatitlan. The “Km 22″* landfill is a key part of this project and the approximately 130 guajeros who work at the site are valued, respected and are essential to the system. Not only do they remove waste that would otherwise enter the landfill they also benefit from social services provided by the organization. While many in society look down on the guajeros, here they are seen as an asset that contribute to the environmental goals of AMSA by prolonging the life of the landfill. It is estimated that they remove approx 6% of the solid waste that arrives at the site, an estimated 136 tons of the 820 tons that arrive every day. Workers are divided into two groups and work three alternating days a week at the site.

* So designated as this is the distance marker for the road to the Pacific Ocean.

A guajero readies her collection bags for a day of waste picking in the AMSA landfill near Guatemala City. (Cindy Bajema)

A guajero readies her collection bags for a day of waste picking in the AMSA landfill near Guatemala City. (©Cindy Bajema)

 

Paula Pocon, age 55, and her daughter Ana Patricia, age 34, have both been working at the AMSA landfill as guajeros or waste pickers, for about 2 years. Both are grateful for the work that supports their families. (Cindy Bajema)

Paula Pocon, age 55, and her daughter Ana Patricia, age 34, have both been working at the AMSA landfill as guajeros or waste pickers, for about 2 years. Both are grateful for the work that supports their families. (©Cindy Bajema)

Most workers specialize in collecting certain types of recyclables and have often found other usable items as well. Clothes, jewelery and even live animals are regularly found amongst the trash. Other unknown substances are also brought to the site on a regular basis. The guajeros, with little protection or knowledge of what they’re handling, assist with the disposal regardless.

Guajeros work to empty a truck from a nearby Procter & Gamble plant. Despite efforts to improve working conditions, they have little protection against the unknown materials they are exposed to on a daily basis. At present, garbage trucks pay no fees to dump their waste at this site and management funds come from the Guatemalan government. (Cindy Bajema)

Guajeros work to empty a truck from a nearby Procter & Gamble plant. Despite efforts to improve working conditions, they have little protection against the unknown materials they are exposed to on a daily basis. At present, garbage trucks pay no fees to dump their waste at this site and management funds come from the Guatemalan government. (©Cindy Bajema)

Gabriel Calderon, a 21 year old "guajero" or waste picker has been working at the AMSA landfill for 3 years. She collects bottles, plastic, different types of metal and paper. She generally earns about 150 Quetzales a day (approximately $19 US) and is grateful to be working at the AMSA landfill, a model solid waste project on the outskirts of Gautemala City. (Cindy Bajema)

Gabriel Calderon, a 21 year old “guajero” or waste picker has been working at the AMSA landfill for 3 years. She collects bottles, plastic, different types of metal and paper. She generally earns about 150 Quetzales a day (approximately $19 US) and is grateful to be working at the AMSA landfill, a model solid waste project on the outskirts of Guatemala City. (©Cindy Bajema)

Old and young, all seem to be happy to be here. In the words of one of the long time waste pickers, “I feel blessed by God to have this place, it has provided for my family, has provided us with a home and food. This is a sacred place.”

Guajeros and truck drivers all make their living through disposing of other people's waste. (Cindy Bajema)

Guajeros and truck drivers all make their living through disposing of other people’s waste. (©Cindy Bajema)

While AMSA serves as a model project for Guatemala and the Central American region, they seek to do more. The funds they receive from the national government don’t cover all they want to do. Future development plans include a composting facility, a sorting building for recycling , and expansion  of the project to other locales are all future goals. This landfill is scheduled to close in the next few years and the future employment of the guajeros is uncertain. They will have to transition into different jobs / or be employed by the facility in some other way. But for the moment, everyone I spoke to, without exception, was grateful to be working at the landfill where they are treated with dignity and they are deeply proud of the work they do.

All images ©Cindy Bajema 2014

©CindyBajema_20120630_Ladakh.D7_0023

Beguiled by Baltistan

After reading the itinerary, I tried to look it up on a map, but couldn’t find it. A village, Turtuk, in Baltistan. I was going, but as I tried to explain to people… I didn’t really know where Turtuk or Baltistan was, just somewhere high in the mountains of northern India.

Perhaps this contributed to the apprehension that was building for this trip. I’m not a nervous traveler. By this time I have been to many out of the way places and I find that off the beaten path is best to me. But – there was the lack of maps, the warnings about high altitude sickness, the list of medications to bring, and every time I looked at the satellite view of the region on Google maps all I saw was a whole lot of barren or snow-capped mountains. Ask my husband, this is not my preferred type of travel destination. I like cities, I like people, secret neighborhood hideaways – and if I want to relax, I like warm water and beaches. I wondered what I had signed up for…

The “what” I had signed up for was a two-week Master Class Photography Workshop, organized by Travelling Lens and to be taught by Maggie Steber and Ami Vitale, two photojournalists whose work I admire. I was in serious need of mentoring and to me, it really didn’t matter where the class was being held. I was going for that in-your-face interaction that I don’t get through online studies. So, maps be damned, I went.

There was a last minute change in the instructors, bringing us Lana Slezic rather than Maggie Steber, but as we all came to know each other, Lana seemed like a perfect fit for this trip. We started in Leh, the former capitol of the Himalayan kingdom of Ladakh. We spent three days there to acclimatize to the altitude. We felt it. Climbing the flight of stairs to my room left me gasping on the first day. But after a few days of exploring Leh and its surroundings, we were breathing easier. We prepared ourselves and began our Innova caravan over the Khardung La pass. At 5,359 m/ 17,582 ft. it’s one of the highest motorable roads in the world. But, we made it up and over and began the descent towards the Nubra Valley and the next day, into Baltistan and Turtuk.

As I said, I hadn’t been sure what to expect. I had envisioned a few houses in the midst of open, perhaps barren lands with a few scattered trees to offer a bit of occasional shade. I knew we would be camping in tents and I imagined we would be rather exposed and in primitive surroundings. Instead, our camp was a permanent setup with quite luxurious “Swiss” tents (the term “glamping” was used.) Turtuk itself was a village that is charming in a way that I find difficult to describe. From our camp we had to walk up a trail to the hillside above to reach the village.

Surrounded by fields of barley and vegetables, Turtuk is quite large, with meandering pathways running between houses, gardens, streams, animal pens and many, many apricot trees.

There were children everywhere and we quickly got to know a few. We did hear a scattered bit of “one pen,” “one candy,” “one photo,” from the children so it was clear we were not the first to visit this village.

But some of the older ones spoke decent English in addition to the Hindi that many of us spoke and it wasn’t long before we were being invited into homes and offered the famous (and to my tastes, delicious!) local sabas chai (salt tea) of the region. They also served us “paika”, made of barley flour mixed with sabas chai and ghee that you scoop into a ball with your fingers and eat to get some stick-to-your-ribs nutrition.

Three cups of tea...

What transpired over the next several days was magical. We were welcomed into homes and hearts. We were befriended and embraced.

We were told of hopes, of dreams and yes, of fears. We experienced hospitality of a kind that is rarely encountered in the modern world and I think it’s safe to say that we all, every one of us, dream of our return.

 

Character Studies

Sometimes when I’m out taking photos for another purpose entirely, I’ll stumble across a good image. It isn’t a full-on story – just one person living their life in their own way. One of the things that I love about being a photographer is that I have a reason to talk to them and find out more about their life.

Atong, aged 50. Manila, Philippines.

This is Atong. He works at a small factory in Caloocan (Manila, Philippines) that prints and sells sacks used for storing grains. They also sell used sacks. Atong is 50 years old and has been working here for 30 years – since he came to Manila from Cebu. He is proud of the fact that he gets paid more than minimum wage.

*minimum wage in the Philippines is 426 pesos/day, about $10 US.